Creating stronger, resilient communities

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Minnesota's climate is changing rapidly and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Extreme rain events are more intense and more frequent than at any time on record, with devastating effects for homes, businesses, and local communities. Minnesota now ranks second in the country for extreme weather events, only behind California, resulting in Minnesotans seeing a 366% increase in homeowner insurance rates since 1998.

Adapting to climate change requires a community-by-community approach. That is why the Walz – Flanagan Administration proposed, and the legislature approved, funding to help local and tribal governments assess the risks of increased flooding and develop plans to enhance stormwater infrastructure. More is needed to ensure communities are prepared to respond to extreme weather and become more resilient to future climate conditions.


Possible goals

A small office building next to a small parking lot with a single parked car
Leaves gathering in the grates of a storm drain surrounded by water
One third of Minnesota’s local governments have completed planning specifically to address climate vulnerability and build resilience by 2030


State funding for resilience planning and project implementation has increased by 25%



An aerial view of a small town with forest beyond

Climate risks and resiliency provisions are included in 80% of county hazard mitigation plans by 2025



Minnesota's climate is changing rapidly and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Extreme rain events are more intense and more frequent than at any time on record, with devastating effects for homes, businesses, and local communities. Minnesota now ranks second in the country for extreme weather events, only behind California, resulting in Minnesotans seeing a 366% increase in homeowner insurance rates since 1998.

Adapting to climate change requires a community-by-community approach. That is why the Walz – Flanagan Administration proposed, and the legislature approved, funding to help local and tribal governments assess the risks of increased flooding and develop plans to enhance stormwater infrastructure. More is needed to ensure communities are prepared to respond to extreme weather and become more resilient to future climate conditions.


Possible goals

A small office building next to a small parking lot with a single parked car
Leaves gathering in the grates of a storm drain surrounded by water
One third of Minnesota’s local governments have completed planning specifically to address climate vulnerability and build resilience by 2030


State funding for resilience planning and project implementation has increased by 25%



An aerial view of a small town with forest beyond

Climate risks and resiliency provisions are included in 80% of county hazard mitigation plans by 2025



Page last updated: 16 August 2021, 12:37