Transitioning to clean energy and more efficient buildings

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Minnesota’s electricity generation is getting cleaner: 55% came from carbon-free resources in 2020. Our electric power sector has reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 40% over the past 10 years. Minnesota is ranked #9 on energy efficiency out of 50 states by American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.

But some sectors are experiencing a rise in greenhouse base emissions. Since 2005, greenhouse gas emissions in the commercial building sector have increased by 15%, partly driven by greater heating and cooling demands caused by our changing climate.

In May 2021, with bipartisan support, Governor Walz signed into law the Energy Conservation and Optimization (ECO) Act. The ECO Act will reduce greenhouse gases by approximately two million tons per year, while saving Minnesotans millions of dollars in energy costs. Investments in energy efficiency and conservation not only help address climate change, but also create jobs in small and large companies across the state.


Existing goals

A worker stands on top of a wind turbine under construction.
A field of solar panels with the sun setting in the background.
Establish a standard to achieve 100%

carbon-free electricity generation by 2040



Increase the Renewable Energy Standard to achieve 55% by 2050



A tree with falling yellow leaves in the front yard of a tan house with brown trim.
Workers and a large crane on a large building construction site.
Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from existing buildings by 50% by 2035

Improve codes and standards for all new commercial and large multi-family buildings to achieve net-zero by 2036


Minnesota’s electricity generation is getting cleaner: 55% came from carbon-free resources in 2020. Our electric power sector has reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 40% over the past 10 years. Minnesota is ranked #9 on energy efficiency out of 50 states by American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy.

But some sectors are experiencing a rise in greenhouse base emissions. Since 2005, greenhouse gas emissions in the commercial building sector have increased by 15%, partly driven by greater heating and cooling demands caused by our changing climate.

In May 2021, with bipartisan support, Governor Walz signed into law the Energy Conservation and Optimization (ECO) Act. The ECO Act will reduce greenhouse gases by approximately two million tons per year, while saving Minnesotans millions of dollars in energy costs. Investments in energy efficiency and conservation not only help address climate change, but also create jobs in small and large companies across the state.


Existing goals

A worker stands on top of a wind turbine under construction.
A field of solar panels with the sun setting in the background.
Establish a standard to achieve 100%

carbon-free electricity generation by 2040



Increase the Renewable Energy Standard to achieve 55% by 2050



A tree with falling yellow leaves in the front yard of a tan house with brown trim.
Workers and a large crane on a large building construction site.
Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from existing buildings by 50% by 2035

Improve codes and standards for all new commercial and large multi-family buildings to achieve net-zero by 2036


Page last updated: 16 August 2021, 12:36